Zagreb: Putting Users at the Center of Digital Design

Last week I went to Zagreb on behalf of the Open Society Foundations to get user input on a new online library dedicated of health rights video.

We hope that the videos will be used by instructors in medical, law, and public health setting to introduce student to important human rights concepts like palliative care for those in chronic pain, harm reduction for drug users, and respectful and inclusive healthcare provision to marginalized people like Roma, sex workers, and those with mental disabilities.

IMG_4240

Getting feedback from instructors (I am second from the right).

Though the video library is not live yet, we wanted to get feedback from real instructors about what they needed to use these videos in a classroom context.  The faculty members were from a range of Central and Eastern European countries, including Lithuania, Croatia, Germany, and Armenia.  They had come together to attend a seminar in human rights in patient care at the Andrija Štampar School of Public Health in Zagreb.

In order to identify the most common requests, I broke faculty members into groups and then collated the results to identify high, moderate, and low priorities (see image below).  I am currently working with our web designer, Yulia (who also took the photos), to develop a technical solution that meets these needs.

My analysis of user feedback identified high, moderate, and low priorities based on frequency of user requests.

My analysis of user feedback identified high, moderate, and low priorities based on frequency of user requests.

Putting users at the center of a design process is critical.  In fact, it’s the only way to develop a solution likely to serve their needs.